"Till morning dawned I was tossed on a buoyant but unquiet sea, where billows of trouble rolled under surges of joy."
— Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre.

lizziedarcys:

I wanted to do a Brontë challenge/meme, but I couldn’t find one - so I made up one for myself to do. And by ‘made up,’ I mean ‘slightly adapted the 30 day Jane Austen challenge.’

  • Favourite Brontë sister
  • Favourite female character
  • Favourite male character
  • Favourite book
  • Favourite quote from the books
  • Favourite moment(s) in the books
  • Favourite adaptation or modernisation
  • Favourite Brontë couple
  • Least favourite Brontë couple
  • Least favourite book
  • Least favourite female character
  • Least favourite male character
  • Least favourite adaptation or modernisation
  • A moment that made you smile while reading
  • A moment that made you mad while reading
  • Favourite supporting character
  • Favourite female casting decision
  • Favourite male casting decision
  • Favourite quote from the films
  • Favourite moment in the films
  • Favourite character backstory or secret
  • Favourite character connection (e.g., Jane and St. John being cousins; Helen Huntingdon & Frederick Lawrence etc.)
  • Character you most relate to

rrozabelikov:

Volume I & Volume II

I have dreamt in my life, dreams that have stayed with me ever after, and changed my ideas; they have gone through and through me, like wine through water, and altered the color of my mind. And this is one: I’m going to tell it - but take care not to smile at any part of it.

priestess-of-avalon:

Literature meme - [2/2] Deaths - Catherine Earnshaw-Linton (Wuthering Heights - Emily Brontë)
'May she wake in torment!' he cried, with frightful vehemence, stamping his foot, and groaning in a sudden paroxysm of ungovernable passion. 'Why, she's a liar to the end! Where is she? Not there—not in heaven—not perished—where? Oh! you said you cared nothing for my sufferings! And I pray one prayer—I repeat it till my tongue stiffens—Catherine Earnshaw, may you not rest as long as I am living; you said I killed you—haunt me, then! The murdered do haunt their murderers, I believe. I know that ghosts have wandered on earth. Be with me always—take any form—drive me mad! only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! Oh, God! it is unutterable! I cannot live without my life! Icannot live without my soul!’

priestess-of-avalon:

Literature meme - [2/2] Deaths - Catherine Earnshaw-Linton (Wuthering Heights - Emily Brontë)

'May she wake in torment!' he cried, with frightful vehemence, stamping his foot, and groaning in a sudden paroxysm of ungovernable passion. 'Why, she's a liar to the end! Where is she? Not there—not in heaven—not perished—where? Oh! you said you cared nothing for my sufferings! And I pray one prayer—I repeat it till my tongue stiffens—Catherine Earnshaw, may you not rest as long as I am living; you said I killed you—haunt me, then! The murdered do haunt their murderers, I believe. I know that ghosts have wandered on earth. Be with me always—take any form—drive me mad! only do not leave me in this abyss, where I cannot find you! Oh, God! it is unutterable! cannot live without my life! Icannot live without my soul!’

the-library-and-step-on-it:

A letter from Charlotte Brontë to Henry Nussey (5 March 1839), in which she turned down his marriage proposal.

"Before answering your letter, I might have spent a long time in consideration of its subject; but as from the first moment of its reception and perusal I determined on which course to pursue, it seemed to me that delay was wholly unnecessary. You are aware that I have many reasons to feel gratified to your family, that I have peculiar reasons for affection towards one at least of your sisters, and also that I highly esteem yourself. Do not therefore accuse me of wrong motives when I say that my answer to your proposal must be a decided negative. In forming this answer — I trust I have listened to the dictates of conscience more than to those of inclination; I have no personal repugnance to the idea of a union with you — but I feel convinced that mine is not the sort of disposition calculated to form the happiness of a man like you. It has always been my habit to study the character of those amongst whom I chance to be thrown, and I think I know yours and can imagine what description of woman would suit you for a wife. Her character should not be too marked, ardent and original — her temper should be mild, her piety undoubted, her spirits even and cheerful, and her 'personal attractions' sufficient to please your eye and gratify your just pride. As for me, you do not know me, I am not this serious, grave, cool-headed individual you suppose — You would think me romantic and eccentric — you would say I was satirical and severe. However, I scorn deceit and I will never for the sake of attaining the distinction of matrimony and escaping the stigma of an old maid take a worthy man whom I am conscious I cannot render happy.”

After becoming curate of the parish church of Earnley, near Chichester, Henry had begun to search for an appropriate wife. He had known Charlotte through her friendship with his younger sister, Ellen, from about 1835. Her polite demurral seemingly aroused no apparent resentment on the part of the Nusseys, nor does it seem to have weighed on Charlotte’s mind, for she remained on companiable terms with Henry for many years.

the-library-and-step-on-it:

A letter from Charlotte Brontë to Henry Nussey (5 March 1839), in which she turned down his marriage proposal.

"Before answering your letter, I might have spent a long time in consideration of its subject; but as from the first moment of its reception and perusal I determined on which course to pursue, it seemed to me that delay was wholly unnecessary. You are aware that I have many reasons to feel gratified to your family, that I have peculiar reasons for affection towards one at least of your sisters, and also that I highly esteem yourself. Do not therefore accuse me of wrong motives when I say that my answer to your proposal must be a decided negative. In forming this answer — I trust I have listened to the dictates of conscience more than to those of inclination; I have no personal repugnance to the idea of a union with you — but I feel convinced that mine is not the sort of disposition calculated to form the happiness of a man like you. It has always been my habit to study the character of those amongst whom I chance to be thrown, and I think I know yours and can imagine what description of woman would suit you for a wife. Her character should not be too marked, ardent and original — her temper should be mild, her piety undoubted, her spirits even and cheerful, and her 'personal attractions' sufficient to please your eye and gratify your just pride. As for me, you do not know me, I am not this serious, grave, cool-headed individual you suppose — You would think me romantic and eccentric — you would say I was satirical and severe. However, I scorn deceit and I will never for the sake of attaining the distinction of matrimony and escaping the stigma of an old maid take a worthy man whom I am conscious I cannot render happy.”

After becoming curate of the parish church of Earnley, near Chichester, Henry had begun to search for an appropriate wife. He had known Charlotte through her friendship with his younger sister, Ellen, from about 1835. Her polite demurral seemingly aroused no apparent resentment on the part of the Nusseys, nor does it seem to have weighed on Charlotte’s mind, for she remained on companiable terms with Henry for many years.

o-dysseys:

LITERATURE MEME | 7 characters - (5) catherine earnshaw from emily brontë’s wuthering heights

“I cannot express it; but surely you and everybody have a notion that there is or should be an existence of yours beyond you. What were the use of my creation, if I were entirely contained here? My great miseries in this world have been Heathcliff’s miseries, and I watched and felt each from the beginning: my great thought in living is himself. If all else perished, and he remained, I should still continue to be; and if all else remained, and he were annihilated, the universe would turn to a mighty stranger: I should not seem a part of it. My love for Linton is like the foliage in the woods: time will change it, I’m well aware, as winter changes the trees. My love for Heathcliff resembles the eternal rocks beneath: a source of little visible delight, but necessary. Nelly, I am Heathcliff! He’s always, always in my mind: not as a pleasure, any more than I am always a pleasure to myself, but as my own being.”

willhuntings:

history meme | 2/8 women | charlotte brontë

Charlotte Brontë (21 April 1816 – 31 March 1855) was an English novelist and poet, the eldest of the three Brontë sisters who survived into adulthood, whose novels are English literature standards. She wrote Jane Eyre under the pen name Currer Bell, a masculine alias as female-written works were not readily accepted. Jane Eyre is considered a monument of feminist work, and years ahead of its time in terms of feminism.  The Brontë sisters were extremely close as children, and Charlotte went to college, and tried to earn a living as a governess and a teacher, but eventually returned home. Jane Eyre, published in 1847, was her first novel, followed by Shirley in 1948 and Villette in 1853. In 1848, both Branwell and Emily Brontë died, followed by Anne a year later. Charlotte married Arthur Nicholas Bell in 1954, but died a year later from pregnancy complications.

desertcolossus:

literary picspams → wuthering heights by emily brontë (@lessaofpern)

I have dreamt in my life, dreams that have stayed with me ever after, and changed my ideas; they have gone through and through me, like wine through water, and altered the color of my mind.

(x)

desertcolossus:

literary picspams → wuthering heights by emily brontë (@lessaofpern)

I have dreamt in my life, dreams that have stayed with me ever after, and changed my ideas; they have gone through and through me, like wine through water, and altered the color of my mind.

(x)

"

I was sorry for her; I was amazed, disgusted at her heartless vanity; I wondered why so much beauty should be given to those who made so bad a use of it, and denied to some who would make it a benefit to both themselves and others.

But, God knows best, I concluded. There are, I suppose, some men as vain, as selfish, and as heartless as she is, and, perhaps, such women may be useful to punish them.

"
— Anne Brontë, Agnes Grey (via whimsies-emiliecatherine)
thewicked-eternity