Market Street, Thornton, West Yorkshire

Market Street, Thornton, West Yorkshire

Branwell Brontë

mysteryofhistory:

Branwell Brontë drew this while on his deathbed.

“All my life I have done nothing either great or good.”

posted 2 years ago with 13 notes
"

…she died without sever struggle - resigned - trusting in God - thankful for release from a suffering life - deeply assured that a better existence lay before her - She believed - she hoped, and declared her belief and hope with her last breath. - Her quiet - Christian death did not rend my heart as Emily’s stern, simply, undemonstrative end did - I let Anne go to God and felt He had a right to her.

I could hardly let Emily go - I wanted to hold her back then - and I want her back hourly now - Anne, from her childhood seemed preparing for an early death - Emily’s spirit seemed strong enough to bear her to fulness of years - They are both gone - and so is poor Branwell - and Papa has now me only - the weakest - puniest - least promising of his six children - Consumption has taken the whole five.

"
— Charlotte Bronte in a letter written a few days after Anne’s death.
errolivio:

The Duke of Zamorna from the made up world of Angria, created by the Bronte sister’s and drawn by their brother Branwell.

errolivio:

The Duke of Zamorna from the made up world of Angria, created by the Bronte sister’s and drawn by their brother Branwell.

theoddmentemporium:

The Brontes invented imaginary realms, and created some of the first fan-fiction.

The Brontë sisters are best known as the authors of literary gothic tales like Wuthering Heights and Jane Eyre, but in their childhood, they worked with their brother to invent the made-up realm of the Glass Town Federation.
According to the British Library, which is featuring the Brontë’s hand-written Glass Town sagas as part of its new exhibition on science fiction, the four Brontë siblings invented the kingdoms of Angria and Gondal, and the capital city of Glass Town. “They became obsessive about their imaginary worlds, drawing maps and creating lives for their characters and featured themselves as the “gods” (“genii”) of their world. Their stories are in tiny micro-script, as if written by their miniature toy soldiers.”
The storytelling started with the toy soldiers and became their own publication, the Young Men’s Magazine, as explained by Branwell Brontë in his book, The History Of The Young Men From Their First Settlement To The Present Time.
Charlotte and Branwell Brontë created the kingdom of Angria with their younger sisters Emily and Anne — but the younger Brontë sisters broke away and created their own kingdom, Gondal, when the older siblings assigned them “inferior parts” in their group storytelling. Originally, these kingdoms were pure made-up fantasy worlds, but over time the Brontë sisters started adding characters from popular fiction and real life. 

Tales of Glass Town, Angria and Gondal on Google Books!

theoddmentemporium:

The Brontes invented imaginary realms, and created some of the first fan-fiction.

The Brontë sisters are best known as the authors of literary gothic tales like Wuthering Heights and Jane Eyre, but in their childhood, they worked with their brother to invent the made-up realm of the Glass Town Federation.

According to the British Library, which is featuring the Brontë’s hand-written Glass Town sagas as part of its new exhibition on science fiction, the four Brontë siblings invented the kingdoms of Angria and Gondal, and the capital city of Glass Town. “They became obsessive about their imaginary worlds, drawing maps and creating lives for their characters and featured themselves as the “gods” (“genii”) of their world. Their stories are in tiny micro-script, as if written by their miniature toy soldiers.”

The storytelling started with the toy soldiers and became their own publication, the Young Men’s Magazine, as explained by Branwell Brontë in his book, The History Of The Young Men From Their First Settlement To The Present Time.

Charlotte and Branwell Brontë created the kingdom of Angria with their younger sisters Emily and Anne — but the younger Brontë sisters broke away and created their own kingdom, Gondal, when the older siblings assigned them “inferior parts” in their group storytelling. Originally, these kingdoms were pure made-up fantasy worlds, but over time the Brontë sisters started adding characters from popular fiction and real life. 

Tales of Glass Town, Angria and Gondal on Google Books!

peltthetreewithlaughter:

Charlotte and Branwell Brontë’s homemade books.

Charlotte and Branwell crafted dozens and dozens of these little (4x5-cm) books. Since paper was expensive back in the day, they made the books by sewing together scraps of newspaper lying around the house. One of the best things about the books is the handwriting, which is so small that you need a magnifying glass to read it.
Some books have short stories inside, like Charlotte’s “The Poetester,” about an aspiring poet who tries to off one of his critics after a bad review. Others are parodies of popular Victorian literary magazines. Have you ever babysat for a 12-year-old who spent his free time making 2-inch replicas of The New Yorker, complete with cartoons and a 12-year-old’s “Talk of the Town”? Me neither, but that was basically Branwell Brontë.

(via Tiny DIY Books by Victorian Tweens | The Hairpin)

peltthetreewithlaughter:

Charlotte and Branwell Brontë’s homemade books.

Charlotte and Branwell crafted dozens and dozens of these little (4x5-cm) books. Since paper was expensive back in the day, they made the books by sewing together scraps of newspaper lying around the house. One of the best things about the books is the handwriting, which is so small that you need a magnifying glass to read it.

Some books have short stories inside, like Charlotte’s “The Poetester,” about an aspiring poet who tries to off one of his critics after a bad review. Others are parodies of popular Victorian literary magazines. Have you ever babysat for a 12-year-old who spent his free time making 2-inch replicas of The New Yorker, complete with cartoons and a 12-year-old’s “Talk of the Town”? Me neither, but that was basically Branwell Brontë.

(via Tiny DIY Books by Victorian Tweens | The Hairpin)

thewicked-eternity